Children’s Mental Health Week February 5-11

Here is our latest powerpoint from our 5 minutes for inclusion series

‘What is the impact of Speech Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) on children’s mental health and well-being?’

This presentation looks at both the risk factors, the protective factors and the wider impact on mental health and well-being for young people with SLCN.

Signalong Get ready for Easter

Signalong, The Communication Charity, provides resources, training and free advice, and readily works with others in the field to promote communication skills for children and adults with speech, language and communication needs and English as an additional language.

They produce a free education resource every Friday. This week’s theme is ‘Get Ready for Easter!’

Signalong – The Communication Charity

Download the song and recipe PDF file here:

How to make a Coreboard

Core boards are tools used in augmented and alternative communication (AAC) with students who have difficulty with verbal speech. They feature a grid of symbols, words and phrases which represent concepts. Evidence (and experience) shows them to be invaluable in supporting communication for our SEN learners.

Eloise Bromwich, from the Tower Hamlets Speech and Language Therapy team, has developed a Core board for use across Tower Hamlets schools. Eloise demonstrates how to turn the resources into a functional low-tech AAC device. High Tech communication aids, such as Proloqu and TD Snap, use the same principle. Putting a low-tech device into practice before implementing higher-tech AAC is usually a good way of introducing the concepts.

Eloise demonstrates how to make the core boards below.

Thanks Eloise!

UK Disability History Month 16 November – 16 December

This Autumn 2023 UKDHM focuses on the Experience of Disablement amongst children and young people in the past, now and what is needed for the future.

A filmed talk and Powerpoint by Richard Reiser, learning disability advocate, developed for a Hackney special school staff.

Please click this link for school resources: Schools and Colleges – UK Disability History Month (ukdhm.org)

Developmental Language Disorder -DLD

Key facts

Developmental: starts in childhood, but continues
Language: sentences, vocabulary, grammar. Can be understanding and / or talking
Disorder: not something that a child will just grow out of
It is often called categorised as a ‘Hidden disability’.

Listen to lovely poem read by a child with DLD. (Dorset NHS Trust)

For more information:NAPLIC | Developmental Language Disorder, Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) – Afasic

Educating your child at home

Homeschooling your child may be challenging if your child has Special Educational Needs (SEN). But there’s online support and a range of educational and fun activities to help you.There are plenty of online resources, from teaching packs and activities to apps and online games.

Know the law

If your child has SEN and attends a special school, you’ll need to get the council’s permission to educate them at home. You do not need the council’s permission if your child attends a mainstream school, even if they have an education, health and care (EHC) plan

Educating your child at home – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)  – Education Otherwise

Online resources

Homeschooling your child | Disability charity Scope UK

Getting Started – Home Education Advisory Service (heas.org.uk)

Not SATisfactory-How the KS2 reading test fails working-class children

‘The 2023 analysis of Key Stage 2 SATs scores showed a correlation between levels of affluence and success on the tests. Schools in poorer areas did less well – an ongoing trend.This year, teachers and parents voiced concerns regarding the perceived unfairness and difficulty of the KS2 Reading test. These concerns centre on the length of the texts used, but some pointed out that the content reflected middle class experiences and language. 

If the desire is to continue with an end-of-key stage reading test then greater thought needs to be given to the content of the texts used. One option would be to provide Year 6 teachers with a theme at the start of the academic year which will eventually be used in the SAT. This would create a more universal knowledge base, and also mitigate against teaching to the test to some extent. 

Alternatively, topics should be chosen which a greater number of children are likely to have knowledge about. Over a million children in the last year have been supported by food banks. Perhaps texts about visiting food banks might reveal more about children’s actual reading ability than texts about visiting caves in Derbyshire.’

Primary Matters Autumn 2021 (nate.org.uk),Dr Wayne Tennent- Senior Lecturer at Brunel University, London, England.

Classroom Strategies to Support Pupils with Literacy KS2

Great learning at Arnhem Wharf Primary School led by LLC advisors Alison Haines and Tracey Grant. Staff delved into current theory and innovative practice leading to classroom success!