Children’s Mental Health Week February 5-11

Here is our latest powerpoint from our 5 minutes for inclusion series

‘What is the impact of Speech Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) on children’s mental health and well-being?’

This presentation looks at both the risk factors, the protective factors and the wider impact on mental health and well-being for young people with SLCN.

UK Disability History Month 16 November – 16 December

This Autumn 2023 UKDHM focuses on the Experience of Disablement amongst children and young people in the past, now and what is needed for the future.

A filmed talk and Powerpoint by Richard Reiser, learning disability advocate, developed for a Hackney special school staff.

Please click this link for school resources: Schools and Colleges – UK Disability History Month (ukdhm.org)

Educating your child at home

Climate change and Environmental Science

Enjoy a light-hearted illustrated children’s book about climate change and caring for our animals that is perfect for inspiring the next Greta Thunberg or David Attenborough.

Listen to the author read it aloud- https://youtu.be/ZEn-6ZiAUNM

Climate Change resources

Climate change resources for schools | WWF

Climate Change for Kids – Science Experiments for Kids (science-sparks.com)

17 Weather Science Projects and Lessons | Science Buddies Blog

Educating your child at home

Homeschooling your child may be challenging if your child has Special Educational Needs (SEN). But there’s online support and a range of educational and fun activities to help you.There are plenty of online resources, from teaching packs and activities to apps and online games.

Know the law

If your child has SEN and attends a special school, you’ll need to get the council’s permission to educate them at home. You do not need the council’s permission if your child attends a mainstream school, even if they have an education, health and care (EHC) plan

Educating your child at home – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)  – Education Otherwise

Online resources

Homeschooling your child | Disability charity Scope UK

Getting Started – Home Education Advisory Service (heas.org.uk)

November 24th is No Pens Wednesday

What is No Pens Wednesday?*

It is a national day dedicated to speaking and understanding language which takes place in schools and settings annually. Click on the picture above, or link below to sign up and get lots of ideas to try in your class. There are ideas for Early Years, Primary and Secondary.

Why take part?

Speaking and understanding language are often overlooked in the UK education system in comparison to written language skills. However, as with literacy and numeracy, schools can play a crucial role in developing children’s skills in this important area.

No Pens Day Wednesday puts speaking and understanding language in the spotlight. Through a day of fun and engaging activities, schools and
settings can:

Raise awareness of the importance of speaking and understanding skills with staff, children and families.

Improve children and young people’s speaking and understanding skills and increase their engagement in lessons.

Support their curriculum’s focus on speaking and understanding language, and develop staff skills and confidence in teaching speaking and understanding skills.

Identify children who may have speech, language and communication needs and provide additional support.

Why is it so important?

Language levels at age two predict reading, writing and maths ability when children start school.

As many as 50% of children in some areas of social disadvantage start school with delayed language. Without early support, these children may struggle to catch up with their peers.

In Primary School:

Children who have difficulties speaking and understanding language are at a higher risk of behavioural, social and emotional difficulties in childhood and through adolescence.

More than 90% of children who have persistent language difficulties at age 5 have literacy difficulties at age 15.

In Secondary School: 

Good communication skills are rated as the most important employability skills needed for young people entering their first job – from a survey of schools, employers and politicians.

Up to 88% of long-term unemployed young men may have speech, language and communication needs.

*taken from the ICAN guide to the day

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